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greg_mazur
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Posted - Apr 15 2015 :  01:41:07   View greg_mazur's Photo Gallery  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Found excellent heat insulation material. Ceramic wet blanket. Available at oil furnace
Supply houses. Used to repair and form furnace combustion chamber.
Comes moist, cut and place along top metal plate just,below spark plugs.
Completely shields plugs from heat soak during shutdown. First drive will
Dry and form material. Many other uses on other turbo cars.

Hit Man X
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Posted - Apr 21 2015 :  15:31:23  Show Profile  Send Hit Man X an AOL message  Send Hit Man X an ICQ Message  Click to see Hit Man X's MSN Messenger address  Send Hit Man X a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
Hey Greg -

Any idea how this compares to ceramic coating components? I had my turbocharger rebuilt and upgraded, while down I had the turbine housing coated.

This is my sig...

Four 745i! One '83 and three '85...I am a glutton for punishment.
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greg_mazur
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Posted - Apr 21 2015 :  16:25:32   View greg_mazur's Photo Gallery  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Purpose of this is to shield rising heat from the spark plugs and wires following a shutdown. There is a metal plate there already.
This allows the heat from the turbo to be sucked out from under the car during driving
By the ram air pipe and yet during shutdown not bake the plugs with heat blown from the turbo timer fan.
I have seen turbos wrapped with ceramic tape , and in my opinion that keeps the heat
In the turbo housing.
Plugs change resistance with heat , and often these 745i's will stall or hesitate following a run while sitting idle in traffic.
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cliffo
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Posted - Apr 22 2015 :  00:05:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi all, i had the manifold, manifold to turbo inlet dump pipe, turbine housing and the wastegate block ceramic coated in black. Product was applied inside and outside of all the components and then baked in an oven. Reputed to reduce underbonnet temps by about 40%, which i cant measure or confirm, but..... Its not as hot under the bonnet anymore after a run. can recommend it as an aftermarket mod. Hope all are well, cheers, Clifton, Melbourne, Oz
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greg_mazur
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Posted - Apr 22 2015 :  02:28:44   View greg_mazur's Photo Gallery  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My only concern with going that route is the heat of the turbo is contained. That cooks the oil. Do some oil temp readings with laser temp reader and see if things are hotter.
I want my turbo to dissipate heat out from its outer surface. And this is done well at speed, I have done readings. But during shutdown and idle that dissipated heat is not
Good for the afm/plugs/wires/intake etc. I use to have a slight idle fluctuation during stops following a run. I thought it was my idle compensation device but actually it was heat soak. Especially effected was the plug at block right above the turbo.
In general you want to keep your intake air as cold as possible, your exhaust header hot to prevent back pressure, your turbo cool to prevent oil damage, and any electrical components stable heat environment. The ram air pipe on the 745i turbo housing does a really good job at speed, but we don't have water cooling at the turbo bearings only oil.
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cliffo
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Posted - Apr 22 2015 :  17:21:01  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I hear you. Am using a 20w-50 synthetic oil specific for turbo engines, obviously more frequent oil changes, not shutting car off immediately after a period of boost, which is easy in day to day driving, also why the cool down lap on club track days is so important, and having the inside of the turbine housing ceramic coated as well to stop the heat soak into the bearing section, similar to your suggestion of the heat wrap with the added benefit of reduced heat soaking through and into the housing. If the engine was ever to be in pieces, i would do the pistons and valves as well with the ceramic coating, wonder if the same could be done with the bearing cartridge....hmmm???
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greg_mazur
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Posted - Apr 23 2015 :  02:14:08   View greg_mazur's Photo Gallery  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes it is that oil in the turbo that cooks during shutdown. Buy the best you can.
Interesting side topic. You live in the land of heat, I in the land of cold. I have driven the
745i on days of -10C ~ -15 C and noticed no increase in power or any temp change
In oil or coolant. And after a run the turbo is as hot as any day. The only difference
Is the turbo timer cool down works a lot better sucking in cold air. So when you shut down simply drive into a meat locker!
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cliffo
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Posted - Apr 25 2015 :  21:31:06  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Reminds me of an article i read some years back. Local engineers at GM were testing a 3 lt turbo straight six from Nissan prior to fitting into a locally manufactured four door sedan. Ran it on a dyno, quickly put it into a "meat locker" to test extremes in temperature. The manifold bent like a banana, stripping nuts off bolts etc, etc. the Nissan engineers rushed to take their manifold back to improve their metallurgy, and the resulting changes led to the very very potent RB30 motor in the VL Commodore Turbo, a very very quick car. The moral of this story: I'm staying away from the freezer!!!
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Hit Man X
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Posted - Apr 27 2015 :  16:06:20  Show Profile  Send Hit Man X an AOL message  Send Hit Man X an ICQ Message  Click to see Hit Man X's MSN Messenger address  Send Hit Man X a Yahoo! Message  Reply with Quote
On my running 745i (10/84), I use a set of spark plug boot protectors. They are made of fiberglass I think, similar to turbocharger turbine housing socks.

When the head comes off, I am going to ceramic coat the exhaust manifold and heat shields also. If the bottom end needs rings, I will coat the tops of the pistons for sure. I saw a test between coated and uncoated piston tops on a Powerstroke when attempted to melt with an Oxy torch, too far longer to destroy the piston with the coating.

I first did exhaust piping on my 2002 model WRX Subaru years and years ago. Helped under hood temps and kept the turbocharger lit off quicker.

This is my sig...

Four 745i! One '83 and three '85...I am a glutton for punishment.
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cliffo
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Posted - Apr 30 2015 :  22:05:42  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Same with mine, plus the plug leads shrouded in a heat reflective material as is the plastic high tension plug lead carrier running along the rocker cover. As mine is a right hand drive 6er, we flipped the 745i manifold through 180 degrees, with the result that the exhaust opening was now facing up between cylinders 2 and 3. A mild steel dump pipe was fabbed up to direct the exhaust gas around and down in a loop to the turbine which is now at the front of the block. Long story short, and back on topic, i used to melt plug lead 3, blistered the paint on the inner fender then tried the turbo tape which brittled after a while and started to come away from the dump pipe. Didnt like that, so that when the mild steel dump pipe wore through from the hot gases hitting the first bend, i fabbed up a new dump pipe made from 4mm cast steam pipe, and upgraded the compressor wheel. Did some research and listened to good advice and went the ceramic coating route, inside and outside of all the hot side components. All in a mattish black, for a factory look, and..... It works a treat. I'll accept that it helps keep gas speeds up too, not having the tools to measure such..... And no more burnt or blistered components. Would recommend it to all, cheers, Clifton
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